Swoofty

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Swoofty last won the day on August 3

Swoofty had the most liked content!

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108 Excellent

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About Swoofty

  • Rank
    Trials Monkey
  • Birthday 01/24/75

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    https://www.youtube.com/user/swoofty1

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    MTB, windsurfing, Lego trains, elecrticity
  • Location
    Los Angeles, California

Previous Fields

  • County (UK Only)
    Non UK
  • Real Name
    Peter Norman
  • Bike Ridden
    Multiple
  • Quick Spec
    2018 Czar Neuron 26", I9 hubs, Magura MT5s, XT cranks, HT ME03 pedals
  • Country
    United States
  1. That example is just as confusing. The title of the 55:30 section is called "The back wheel hop" and when Hans demonstrates he calls it a back hop because he's hopping backwards. I guess I just feel the real back hop should get more love and respect than it does these days. Back off a ledge from 2 wheels, now that's a cool seldom seen move these days.
  2. You guys are just getting lazy with your terminology. I bet Ot Pi and Hans Rey and Ryan Leech know the difference between a rear wheel hop and a back hop. We call a Decade a Decade and a G turn a G turn; there's no grey area. I never did understand 'Jap Slap'. Leech called those 'Zap Taps', right? I'll have to look that one up, but I don't want that in my browser history...
  3. https://trashzen.com/back-hop.php copyright circa 1998 for the trashzen tutorial Rear wheel hop - bouncing up and down on the rear wheel Back hop - hopping in the backwards direction from one or both wheels See also back off and back off 180 Mustn't confuse the new kids. Sorry to hear about your leg Jamie.
  4. I've been very impressed with the abilities of a Magura MT4 up front with 203 rotors. I ran MT5s for years up front, but the MT4 gives you plenty of power (for the front), but with great modulation. The MT4s also retract the pad farther than the MT5/7s so less rubbing in general. Plus, there's quite a few aftermarket MT4/6 pads to choose from, although the 9.Ps are great pads all around. The MT8s have been discontinued and you can find them for pretty cheap now (comparatively). I've always wanted to try one of those up front.
  5. Whatever you do, please don't call rear wheel hops "back hops". They are different moves and some very respectable people seem to not know the difference.
  6. The BBB BBS-371S has been the holy grail for MT5/MT7 brakes for me. The pad compound seems to be somewhere between Magura's 9.P and Trialtech's compound and you get the best of both worlds in that they are MT5 style, but with MT7 retaining pin holes. I only use these on the rear; the 9.P is great up front and pad knock eventually goes away. Bike24 has the BBBs.
  7. I came from years of MTB as well, but I went straight to 24" street trials. The compact maneuverability of a 24" is really incredible and one trip to the skatepark will show that unmistakably over a 26". However, for the last 3 years I've been riding 26" (Czar Neuron 26) and have to say that 26" street trials is highly underrated. I 100% prefer my 26 over my 24 now except for the skatepark environment. Sadly the choices for a straight up 26" street trials bike are extremely limited, but there are some older 26" MTBs that are worthy conversions, although they won't match a modern Hex/Czar. 24s are great; they roll around fine and they excel at spins and quick combinations. For you at 6'1" stay away from the Skye unless you just have to have one. All the steel 24s just feel heavy after you've been on an aluminum street trials bike. My vote goes to the Czar Neuron 24 or 26; I've owned both and they were hands down the best bikes I've ever ridden (I'm 5'10"). Inspireds are overpriced new, buy those used so you can upgrade parts. Check out James Barton - all his new videos are on his DJ bike and it doesn't hold him back at all.
  8. Hey Albert, hope all is well in the great white north! I got one of those carbon forks for my TMS and I love that fork. I think I'm gonna get the 9mm through axle version for my street bike and give it a try. At the moment I have 2 pure bikes and no street bikes; what's the world coming to!?!

     

    Cheers

    IMG_20200801_171440.jpg

    1. aliao

      aliao

      Hey man! Great to hear from you :D

      Super happy that you love the fork! They are my favorite forks on my 26”, and I was stoked to find out they were bringing a 400mm disc model to market.

      Hope you and the family are doing well!! After all this pandemic craziness is over, I’d love to come back down to ride again.

      That tms looks awesome and is probably crazy light with those rims! Gonna have to show my friend because he is crazy about 26” disc haha

       

    2. Swoofty

      Swoofty

      The frame is a bit nuts. It's 116 in the rear and not all disc hubs seem to line up correctly. Right now mine's more like 120mm so the disc doesn't rub and the wheel has a 'custom' dish so it's centers correctly. And the brake mount needed A LOT of facing to make it square. Now that it's all together and working, it is a very fun bike, but it's no lighter than my Ozonys V8 pure, just silent!

  9. Nice compilation. I have half the years, but nearly as many bikes! Mine were the opposite, mostly street with an occasional pure here and there. Very cool walk down memory lane.
  10. The Echo Mark 6 Plus was the vertical dropout version. Regular Mk6 was horizontal with 1 1/8 steerer; Plus was vertical drops with tapered headtube. I guess they sold out. A friend was looking into them a while back, but he waited too long.
  11. OK so now it's got dual MT5s and Reverz front and rear so it's weigh-in time. It's a whopping 18.8 pounds/ 8.5 kg. I could go to 180mm rotors front and rear and save a little weight, but there's nothing drastic I could do without getting silly. The first 4 rides have been great and I think the lightness of the carbon rim lets the wheel spin up quicker because I can gap and kick up slightly farther/higher than on my Curve V8 that's pretty much the same weight as this bike. Now I've just got to keep abusing it to see how it holds up.
  12. I ran Pepi's Tire Noodles for a bit before that bike was stolen. Pepi's are made for cross country so they are super light and come in a variety of sizes to suit different tires. I used Muc Off sealant, but sadly, I didn't own that setup for very long. It was on 35mm OD carbon rims with Schwalbe table top tires. https://www.singletracks.com/mtb-gear/pepis-tire-noodle-inserts-save-rubber-and-rims-and-boost-sidewall-stiffness/
  13. Magura MT Trail version comes in silver. Cable disc is ok for the front, but you'll outgrow cable disc on the rear very quickly.
  14. What rim and tire are you running? I'm still using tubes, but I've only lost one in the last year. I've got a Hashtagg 48mm rim and Jitse reverz tire. The new bike has 46mm wide carbon rims and the crap V rubber Carthy tire on the rear and it's bottomed out many times so far with no punctures. I'm 81kg and run around 20 psi.
  15. Another shout out to Industry 9. I'd been running a torch SS hub for over 2 years when it started skipping. I changed the pawls, but that didn't fix it so I sent it in to I9 to check the drive ring. They said the drive ring was cracked and warrantied it even though it was well out of warranty. Better yet, they sent me a new Hydra hub instead of fixing the Torch! The whole process to too long because I had to unbuild my wheel to send it in and at the beginning of the pandemic, I9 converted some of their CNC machines to make respirators and then bike sales went through the roof. So took a while, but worked out great for me.