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Steel 4 Bolt Mounts..


Andy P
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Basically, I remember seeing a website where you could buy various frame components and I fancy welding some 4 bolt brake mounts to the back of some steel disk only forks.

Anyone know which website it was?

Failing that I'll just make some....

Cheers!

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I wouldn't weld the brake mounts to the back of the fork legs though. For normal use the back of the fork legs is in tension, so the chance of causing a fatigue crack from where the brake mounts are welded is quite high. I had a set of Echo urbans with the brake mounts on the back snap after about 9 months - many people snapped them a lot faster - and these were supposed to be designed from the factory for trials loads.It's safer to put them on the front of the fork.

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I wouldn't weld the brake mounts to the back of the fork legs though. For normal use the back of the fork legs is in tension, so the chance of causing a fatigue crack from where the brake mounts are welded is quite high. I had a set of Echo urbans with the brake mounts on the back snap after about 9 months - many people snapped them a lot faster - and these were supposed to be designed from the factory for trials loads.It's safer to put them on the front of the fork.

I've cracked the 08 model that had 4 bold mount on the front, just were the mount was. Don't recommend welding anything onto a fork, if you want to live, but that just my opinion.

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I wouldn't weld the brake mounts to the back of the fork legs though. For normal use the back of the fork legs is in tension, so the chance of causing a fatigue crack from where the brake mounts are welded is quite high. I had a set of Echo urbans with the brake mounts on the back snap after about 9 months - many people snapped them a lot faster - and these were supposed to be designed from the factory for trials loads.It's safer to put them on the front of the fork.

Riding along normally puts very little stress on the forks, it depends more if you gaps to front or tap a lot, or hook/slap more.

In terms of braking power, it's supposedly better on the back of the fork leg.

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I wouldn't weld the brake mounts to the back of the fork legs though. For normal use the back of the fork legs is in tension, so the chance of causing a fatigue crack from where the brake mounts are welded is quite high. I had a set of Echo urbans with the brake mounts on the back snap after about 9 months - many people snapped them a lot faster - and these were supposed to be designed from the factory for trials loads.It's safer to put them on the front of the fork.

Mounts on the back should be better, as you apply the brake, twisting the brake and mounts into the wheel rather than outwards and away from the fork as if the mounts were on the front. My Urbans with maggy mounts on the front have cracked to the point I won't ride them any more after just over 2 months of use. Those braze on mounts should be fine, they use them for the Pashley bikes don't they? Were fine when i had mine.

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Mounts on the back should be better, as you apply the brake, twisting the brake and mounts into the wheel rather than outwards and away from the fork as if the mounts were on the front. My Urbans with maggy mounts on the front have cracked to the point I won't ride them any more after just over 2 months of use. Those braze on mounts should be fine, they use them for the Pashley bikes don't they? Were fine when i had mine.

I think he is mainly referring to the greater stress running through the forks when mounted on the back, leading to a much short life of the forks.

I personally would have reverse mounts any day of the week, and run the risk of shorter fork life.

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I agree that brake mounts on the back of the fork are better for out and out braking performance. The problem arises because most of a fork's time is spent with the rider's weight putting tension in the material at the back of the fork legs. I can neither hook or tap and my fork failed anyway (Snapped completely through both legs) landing off a drop about 6" high. Fatigue cracks need tensile loads to start, so the less you interfere with the grain structure in the metal and the shape of the back of the legs the longer the fork will last. I've had other forks fail through either bending forwards or through cracks forming at the back of the fork legs even without brake mounts being welded there, but they were steel forks, they gave plenty of warning and I'd been using them for over 2 years in all cases...

Edited by psycholist
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