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daveZOO

Ripping the valve from the inner tube

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My tyre with the inner tube is slowly (days, weeks) turning on the rim and the rim rips out the valve from the inner tube.
Is this a common thing? Are there any tricks to fix this or should I just check my valve angle regularly?
I have had many rims and tyres combination with this problem but never found a solution.

IMG_0732_2.thumb.jpg.8110879f1dd0fdcbf86af1bd5c96dbb1.jpg

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Bigger volume inner tube usually fixes this

are you using 20” tubes or the correct 19” ones in that rear tyre?

could also be solved by making the rim tape more grippy somehow? 

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In competitions in France you see some people who zip-tie their valve to the nearer spoke on the right and to the nearer spoke on the left with two different zip-ties. It’s highly unesthetic but it’s pretty efficient.

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On 10/20/2018 at 8:34 PM, DeersSlayer said:

Is your tire pressure too low?

I run between 1.5-2 bar (22-29 psi). I don't know, I would consider these as average pressure.

On 10/20/2018 at 8:41 PM, gage-mann said:

Bigger volume inner tube usually fixes this

are you using 20” tubes or the correct 19” ones in that rear tyre?

could also be solved by making the rim tape more grippy somehow? 

Usually if i find the correct size for the tyre, i go with that but the same thing happens with that as well.

14 hours ago, Canardweb said:

In competitions in France you see some people who zip-tie their valve to the nearer spoke on the right and to the nearer spoke on the left with two different zip-ties. It’s highly unesthetic but it’s pretty efficient.

I saw this before but I didn't know the purpose of it. I will give it a try.

 

Thanks guys for the reply!

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I can imagine that the spoke / valve alignment in that picture is giving anyone who regularly builds wheels nightmares.

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Can we see a picture of the whole wheel...as I'd be questioning the lacing of the spokes rather than how the valve sits....

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I wanted to ask that also.

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Am I right in thinking that that's the rim join I can also see in the picture where the valve is? I always thought they sat opposite one another on rims (i.e. diametrically opposed)...

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On most single wall rims these days the valve hole is drilled through the rim join.  This means that where you'd ordinarily be drilling just the valve hole opposite the join you can drill out a bigger hole to save more weight.

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In my day you wouldn't drill the rim join 'cos that'd be silly. Bloody youngsters.

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4 hours ago, ben_travis said:

I can imagine that the spoke / valve alignment in that picture is giving anyone who regularly builds wheels nightmares.

 

4 hours ago, JohnyMilton said:

Can we see a picture of the whole wheel...as I'd be questioning the lacing of the spokes rather than how the valve sits....

 

2 hours ago, Canardweb said:

I wanted to ask that also.

 

2 hours ago, monkeyseemonkeydo said:

Am I right in thinking that that's the rim join I can also see in the picture where the valve is? I always thought they sat opposite one another on rims (i.e. diametrically opposed)...

It is a factory built Jitsie wheel. As Mark W said, the valve hole is drilled through the joint. I am sure the wheel is stronger this way. The valve is between two sets of crossing spokes, that probably reinforces the joint. Yes, it is difficult to put on the pump head but I prefer my wheel in one piece instead of saving few seconds with the pumping.

IMG_6814_2.thumb.jpg.0b69a76e842325ecbf13457d3ce03e8b.jpgIMG_6813_2.thumb.jpg.5571944c7696e3a510632224e2e6bd3d.jpg

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I'd have thought just using a lock nut on the valve would hold it in place?

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21 hours ago, monkeyseemonkeydo said:

In my day you wouldn't drill the rim join 'cos that'd be silly. Bloody youngsters.

Haha, as long as you don't slip with the drill and take out the pins at either side of the rim you'll be reet ;)

In terms of wheel build strength, it won't really make any difference how it's laced over the valve hole/join - it's just more of a pain in the arse to get your pump on the valve.  Quite a few trials bike companies who do pre-built bikes like the Varials tend to have fairly freestyle lacing, so it's not too surprising.  It's not an intentional thing on their part though - there's no performance advantage from it.

As some other random stuff you could try to help out - using some electrical tape to either make the valve stem a bit of a tighter fit through the valve hole, or even just using it to help keep your rim tape held in place more securely to keep the tube guided properly through the hole could help.  Similarly, putting some talcum powder or similar inside the tyre to stop the tube sticking to the tyre should help keep it in place better too as it won't get smooshed around (technical term) as the tyre slightly moves on the rim.

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Nothing a little epoxy / jb weld wont fix. Just dont EVER grt a flat tyr and ull be reeet

 

I remember drilling 7/8” holes in every part of an alex dx32 aside from the rim joint! 

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I only ever had this happen on my old Schwinn Stingray and I figured it was from hard braking and the whole tire shifting on the rim. An inflated tube won't move independently of the tire will it?

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