Jump to content

How do you perform slow manual?


basstrials
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,there.It is beaten to death,but how do you people perform slow manual,with rear brake or without one,flat on?

I know it is mandatory for downhill stuffs and so,but i am a beginner,so i learning it on flat now.

Got first trials bike a while (old Giant Trial team ) and it is has 1040 wheelbase,which makes it first short one that i have,but it is way difficult to make manual

compared to my other bikes.To me,i feel more natural to try do it slowly and without brake,just use it to prevent looping out.I even change my pedals with plastic ones with small "something like pins" to makes things easier to bail out.Otherwise i ride with 5/10 and Tioga or Nukeproof pedals,they have much grip and i fear for my damaged knee,so i did swapped them out.

Have a nice day,dudes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Part of the problem with the Giant is that the chainstays are really long - that's not ideal for making it easy to manual. They're around 405mm on the Giant, whereas something like a Hex (or most comp frames these days) is 380mm. A few mm makes a big difference to how a bike rides, so you can imagine that a 25mm difference in chainstay length will be noticeable.

The main thing with this is that the initial lift on the manual will be harder, but it should mean it's fairly stable once you find the balance point. For manuals, there's no real 'best' way of doing them - if you look closely at videos of all the top riders, they all have different styles. If you're doing them particularly slow, doing them without the rear brake will be best though seeing as you won't have speed available to you to scrub off. It also looks and sounds a bit better too ;) 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/28/2021 at 11:41 AM, Mark W said:

Part of the problem with the Giant is that the chainstays are really long - that's not ideal for making it easy to manual. They're around 405mm on the Giant, whereas something like a Hex (or most comp frames these days) is 380mm. A few mm makes a big difference to how a bike rides, so you can imagine that a 25mm difference in chainstay length will be noticeable.

The main thing with this is that the initial lift on the manual will be harder, but it should mean it's fairly stable once you find the balance point. For manuals, there's no real 'best' way of doing them - if you look closely at videos of all the top riders, they all have different styles. If you're doing them particularly slow, doing them without the rear brake will be best though seeing as you won't have speed available to you to scrub off. It also looks and sounds a bit better too ;) 

Yes it is hard.On my previous bike Genesis DJ,the chainstay was 425 mm,but with time i was able to do 3-4 meters and actually now riding this Giant,it is seems even more difficult.Maybe because i am not used to rear v brake,maybe because i am old and rusty .:lol:

Anyway,i still love challenge myself.Thank you all of you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The way I learnt was to go a decent pace on the flat or very slightly downhill and make sure when you pull up into it you go far enough or too far and control it with the rear brake. Gives you more time finding the balance point. Too low is unrecoverable, too high is not 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you,everyone.I do practice,but the funny thing is,that i used to do it on my hardtail and now applied to my fully rigid and full-sus one,is way difficult.

I did watch a Youtube clip recently and guy there said,that back brake (even applied a bit) just makes bike out of it is balance point,so you should do ti trough hips movements and without using back brake...only if you looping out.

Edited by basstrials
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...