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Grinding Diskbrakes?


Alun Goch
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Hey evryone, me and a mate had the thought of grinding a diskbrake, but were not sure if it would work.

Would the power / lock increase?

Would modulation be affected?

Would it even work?

We thought as disk brake pads are a much harder compound to rim brakes, perhaps it wouldnt have the same effect, and as the pads are so close to the disk, maybe they would drag and catch?

If anyone has tried this, or if you can see any more pros / cons, please comment.

Thanks, Alun

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Oh dear god, please tell me your not allowed out your house without supervision :D

To be honest, the disc itself is far to thin to grind both sides. Plus, I've never needed any more stopping power on a correctly set up disc, i'm not sure if there is anything to gain. Oh, yer, the pads would last seconds if the disc was rough.

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there was a post on this not too long ago so do a search!

also think about disks bedding in, when they are new the surface is slightly rough, when it beds in it gets smooth and the brake starts working better. so a grind would decrease performance and get rid of the pads in a few seconds due to the compound

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Aha, so power of a disk brake is more dependant on contact area.

I see.....

-dissmisses silly thought of grinding disk-

Thanks guys, super fast replies, sorry for the stupid thought, i would never had tried it though, promise!

-considers a desprate attempt to get out of sticky situation by digging deeper hole asking same question with tar!!! no way...-

Cheers, Alun

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Hey evryone, me and a mate had the thought of grinding a diskbrake, but were not sure if it would work.

Would the power / lock increase?

Would modulation be affected?

Would it even work?

We thought as disk brake pads are a much harder compound to rim brakes, perhaps it wouldnt have the same effect, and as the pads are so close to the disk, maybe they would drag and catch?

If anyone has tried this, or if you can see any more pros / cons, please comment.

Thanks, Alun

nah, i wouldnt bother if i was you.

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Aha, so power of a disk brake is more dependant on contact area.

The power of a disc brake is dependant on the ratio between the lever and caliper piston. The smaller the piston in the lever or larger the piston in the caliper the more powerful the brake (equation for pressure = force X area). However the higher this ratio the more fluid the lever piston must displace to cause movement of the caliper piston

thats what the holes are for.... :unsure:

The holes are primarily for heat dissapation, cleaning crap/water off the pads and weight loss. They do not specifically improve the braking performance of a disc.

There sharp enough they won't need to be any sharper.

Where are they sharp? A decent disc should have been ground properly and have no sharp edges making contact with the pads, although if you run your finger on one of the holes (not recomended, oils from your skin can affect brake performance) it is a very square edge and it may be possible to cut yourself on it.

Edited by Shaun H
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