Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
basstrials

V brake pads alignment

6 posts in this topic

Hi,everyone.I have very noisy rear Jitsie v brake pads,especially when i have to slow down.Initially they have been set parallel to the rim,but LBS mechanic toed them in,so the noise get lower.What is the correct way to be?Parallel or toed?Do they have to bed in like disk ones for example or not?

Pads are new,i did ride a few times only.Got booster,too.

The bike is new to me and i try to learn to do  manual on it,so i have to drag brake,but it drave me crazy like this.

I would appreciated any suggestions,even to change pads,if i have to.

Cheers.

Edited by basstrials

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Jitsie pads are a softer compound than a 'regular' rim brake pad so will be noisier. Toeing in is an old school set up method to limit brake noise and give the brake a more 'progressive' feel. It's usually used for cheaper rim brakes these days, modern brakes are much stiffer and the brake pads too so they don't vibrate any where near as much which is what causes the noise. For Trials it doesn't make a great deal of sense as it will make the brake a little spongy and the pad will be deforming when you pull the brake hard. You will also wear the brake pads unevenly and have to keep toeing them in as they wear.

I'd try some standard rim brake pads in a black rubber compound and set them up normally with no toe in and see how you go. They won't bite anywhere near as well as the Jitsie pads but will be a bit quieter for learning manuals. Once you have the technique down you probably won't use the back brake much and can go back to the Jitsie pads.

If your rim is ground or anodised it will be noisy no matter what brake pads or set up you run especially with soft compound pads -I'd also see how much play is in the brake arms, if there is a lot they will vibrate a lot under braking causing the noise.

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you,my brake arms are SD5(old”new” stock) and they have none play on them.I will try out your suggestions to change pads and set them parallel to the rim.The rims are smooth ones,if that is matter.Actually when grab the grab rear brake lever fast,the noise is very thin and high for the short time,but when i am dragging it.......it is like train coming.Lol.

Otherwise the braking power is awesome,i am 90 kilos,i have never ride V brake on rear,but i like it.....except the sound.

Would TNN backings with black compound be such as noisier as Jitsie ones smoth rom on?

Thank you for your time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HI! After fixing the wheel, it is necessary to center the caliper relative to the rotor, selecting and installing between the frame and caliper crepes washers from the kit, which have various different thicknesses. The catch is that the harder you tighten, the better the interposition of the washers and => the caliper will be closer to the frame, Therefore, by selecting the thickness and number of washers with an accuracy of fractions of a millimeter, you need to try many combinations, you can only advise, be patient when using the sample method and mistakes. But for most manufacturers, the installation is easier - after installing the rotor on the hub and the wheels in place, we tighten the axle with bolts (eccentric). We fasten the adapter tightly (using a thread lock is encouraged). We fasten the caliper (machine) but do not tighten the hexagons (the caliper should "float"). We clamp the brake lever, check if the pads extend equally when pressing the handle.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.You are right about errors and mistakes,i have done it many times since i have posted this thread,so i do know how to do it now.It is sounds funny,but what helped me most,were two advises - well paralleled to rim pads are noisy and hold,second one was to watch pros how they do it.Thank you,everybody.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I think the trial and error method helps in many ways of life :) Yes, there is a truth in these two tips, thank you. I also want to add that if the rotor rubs, we look at the clearance, which block it touches, we relax the caliper mount and slightly shift it towards the rubbing block, while the plane of the block should remain parallel to the plane of the rotor. We tighten the mount slightly, check for clearance, repeat the procedure if necessary. If the rotor rubs on both pads, they can be diluted by unscrewing the adjusting hexagon in the brake lever a little, while the brakes will begin to grab later, if you need, on the contrary, a smaller handle stroke, then the hexagon must be screwed in, you may need to align the rotor.
 

soclikes.com
Regards, Justin Wilson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.