Si-man

The Motorbike Thread

1075 posts in this topic

Yesterday was interesting, hit 125mph, and my ass left the seat a few times on some bumpy back roads. Was a good day.

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125 cleaned up, ready to sell for insurance for the Kawasaki!

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to bongo, I know what it feels like to be high sided, the f**ker just lets go without any warning, you were lucky, after my 60mph one, my collarbone was broke that badly I was sick on the track from the pain. and ruined a perfectly good axo helmet

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Bike insurance is a pain in the ass!!! Checked it last month before i bought my bike and the quotes where about £500, Go on today and struggling to get insurance for under £750.

There is one quote for about £550, Then the next quote down is £750 and so on.

One drawback though, I bought the bike and have no proof of restriction despite it being restricted. The proof according to MCN isn't a legal requirement, The insurance company for £550 wants proof of restriction within 7 days of buying the insurance.

This means i either have to get the £750 insurance, Or find a proof of restriction (Either dyno or a actual certificate by all accounts) :

Good note: Sold the 125 within the first day of advertising it :dance: Had about 8 people contact me lol

EDIT: rang up Kawasaki, they do there own restrictors kit and certificate for just under £30, fitting will be about the same (even though i already have the bloody thing!!). not as bad as i thought.

Edited by trials owns

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that is the only problem with buying a bigger bike with a restrictor second hand, insurance will generally be more as most of them aren't that hard to take out. You will find bike insurance comes down much quicker then car insurance aswell. Or at least thats what i found.

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Just noticed my bead poking through on my rear tyre, broke until end of August!!!

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Soooo, brand new rear tyre tomorrow morning, is it tricky bedding in a spanking new tyre in the rain?

Heard bad things!

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Don't even bother.

I bought part worns. Plenty cheaper and already scrubbed in. :)

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Did you fit them yourself?

Hey bud, Your the guy with the er-6n?

Recently started riding mine, when its on tick-over or slow speeds there a slight winding noise that can be heard above the engine. wondering if this was normal? fuel pump i gather?

Other news took her to a bike meet today, Wasn't to bad, Shame the weather put people of!

A pic from yesterday, Only wearing the mx helmet as it was my first ride and only going slow,

P1020178.jpg

Edited by trials owns

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Picked up my new (to me) bike last night, 2003 Sherco 125. Terrible picture, I'll get some better ones with the proper camera another time.

post-20455-0-58795100-1344501895_thumb.j

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Hey bud, Your the guy with the er-6n?

Recently started riding mine, when its on tick-over or slow speeds there a slight winding noise that can be heard above the engine. wondering if this was normal? fuel pump i gather?

Hey dude, sorry only just seen this. Yeah My guess would be fuel pump. I've done lots of little things to mine including a Scorpion end can which means I can't hear much above the exhaust at any speed! They do have a tendancy to sound like a lawnmower with the standard can and it's definitely worth dropping the stock one for something aftermarket.

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Cheers dude, Saw on the Kawasaki forums that it wasn't nothing major :).

Gonna have to save the penny's for a aftermarket exhaust but fancy one of they tail-tidy just to neaten the rear up a little.

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Just a very noob question!

On the new bike i go through towns, When i have to go a certain speed, This will be either gear 3 low revs (Slipping the clutch a little) or gear 2 higher revs. What would be the best option? gear 2 higher revs is alot noisier (Obviously) and i Dont feel too safe in 2nd when putting on the gas as (in my mind, Yes i know its only 33bhp lol) it will suddenly accelerate which is why i always have very low revs in 3rd but then i cant get my desired speed as easy but in the return of a more friendly power delivery through town,

Any advice appreciated :)

Edited by trials owns

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Don't worry about the noise, use which ever gear you feel comfortable with. I find cornering easier with higher revs though so if it's a twisty turny town, then I'd use 2nd.

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Cheers mate, Just getting used to rolling on 2nd abit smoother :) Feels alot better!

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Some t**t reversed in to my bike while at the gym, only noticed when I was half way home and my bars were about 25 degrees off centre.

Snapped fender and a big scratch. was lucky the bike didn't fall over as it was only on the side stand!

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So with about 20 years of experience riding motorbikes, including about 1000 miles of road riding (abroad), I breezed through my CBT yesterday. The only problems I had were bad habits from trials and MX, like covering the control levers when I wasn't using them, and blipping the throttle and using the front brake against each other, etc. When I asked what next for DAS, the instructor just pointed to his price list, which says I now do about 4-5 days more training and the tests as a cost of £620.

The complete DAS training is surely aimed at total novices, like some of the people on my CBT course, two of which had to be downgraded to automatics because they couldn't handle gear-changes, and several people took forever to gain the confidence to even do 30mph when we were out on the roads. I led most of the way, had little trouble with manoeuvers and was entirely confident.

Anyway, I'm inclined to get a CG 125 on the road, do some practice, and then take the mod 1 and 2 tests. Looking at the test criteria, it seems it's more of the same, and the 'training' looks like its just more practice - drumming into people the necessary skills, and ensuring they really get used to riding a bike. I just don't consider myself in need of that at such a cost.

What do you guys think? How hard is the test, really? Are they just trying to score themselves a load more work?

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Well done on the CBT mate!

I passed mine in January without ever using a geared bike in the past, and bought a CG125 the following day. Used that for about 3-4 months to get used to riding. I contacted my local riding school who asked about my experience and I asked them for a best price. All I did in the end was...

  • 1 day training
  • MOD 1 the next day

then a few weeks later...

  • 1 day training.
  • MOD 2 the next day.

The 3 months on the road was essential I reckon, I did pick up a few bad habits that I wasn't aware of, and would have 100% failed everything without the motorbike school.

I did DAS so now have a full license and a FZS600. Passed both Modules first time with only 1 or 2 minor faults on them each.

Any questions, feel free to ask. :)

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Thanks a lot for the info. That's more what I was thinking - like doing half of the time, rather than the whole lot. I'm going back to Asia in October, so I might do a load more riding there and do the test next year (as I'm an old b'stard, the changes in January won't affect me!).

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I think the main tests (whatever they're called these days - its 15 years since I passed my bike test!) are more to build roadcraft and awareness rather than bike familiarity. Things like drumming in good habits/techniques whilst eliminating bad ones; at the end of the day, if you do something that is deemed outside of the normal training regime (like covering controls - something I also always do) then you will get marked down on the test and potentially fail.

If I recall correctly the tests now are done on 500cc? (there was nothing but 125cc tests in '97) I would be inclined to do at least a day on one of the big bikes in order to get used to the bike before doing the test, you're obviously capable of riding it but what experience of stuff like diesel on a wet road have you got?

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Does anyone here do a bit of green laning?

I am thinking of getting into it - but it all seems a bit like fight club. Any tips for getting started?

I'm guessing I will also need a change of bike, as the DRZ isn't the lightest, or will a set of off road wheels do the trick?

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Done a couple of greenlanes when i used to have the 125, Was great fun! just make sure the bike can take punishment being dropped and parts are cheap and easy to come by.

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Yeah I regret not keeping hold of the of the xt 125, that was light and had both a kick and electric. In fact just looking now, there seem to be some good options going.

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Anybody looked into the new MOT rules I've heard a rumor about? The car thread is full of it. Will it effect riders too?

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