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aener

Stupid Mains Powered Lighting Question

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Hello all.

I've tried Googling, but I think it's such a basic question that I just want to verify that I can't find any answers that unambiguously address it. I'm sure it's a complete no-brainer for anyone who knows even the basics, but I just wanted to check on account of being a n00b.

In my bedroom I have a single ceiling light, with a single switch at the wall.
I haven't opened it up yet, but I've no reason to believe there'd be more than one power cable inside it.
I want to wire two more lamps into a switch on the wall.
I've got a triple wall switch and logistically everything is fine, but here's my question:

Can I just branch the +ve, -ve and earth to all three lamps?
In parallel, of course, but will switching two on halve their brightness, or full brightness and pull twice as much current?
Instinct screams the latter on account of 4-way adaptors etc., but I've not done anything mains related before and just want an authoritative voice on the matter.

 

Thanks!

Edited by aener

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Its not always as easy as you think. I did our kitchen and bathroom light fittings last year and was astounded by how many wires were connected and confused by the way it was wired! 

 ceiling-rose-diagram.jpg

It took me a few attempts, some googling and a good deal of swearing to get it working again!

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Thanks for the input.

That diagram seems to imply a series of lights... Am I misunderstanding?
I want to have three switches, each correlating to one bulb.

 

Is the attached a no-go?

 

To slightly complicate matters, I plan on having two switches for the new bulbs so they can be turned on/off at the wall or at the bed, but that's a simple addition to the circuit. Just don't want to burn the house down!

Edit: ignore the extra earthing cables going to the bulbs - got a bit overexcited :P

 

wires.jpg

 

 

 

Edit 2: Horrible timing. Just found this, which pretty much alludes to the same thing, just more wire-efficient. Add the third in the same way, and all is good?

wiring-a-light-switch-double-light-switc

Edited by aener

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I assumed it'd be simple as per your diagrams but I think that 'lighting rose' thing is more common than not in house circuits so be prepared! You're right that it indicates a series of lights but they're in different rooms so the light in the bedroom doesn't go off when the bulb goes in the hall etc.

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Ah! I see what you mean.

Yes - that makes sense. I'll watch more videos and read guides, but it seems like I can do what I was thinking so long as that "Next Light" cable of yours is also factored in.
I've been thinking of it as an endpoint, rather than one stop in a loop.

Thanks!

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Light wiring was a proper headf**k for me the first time too for the same reason. 

Once it clicks in your head it feels simple, but it’s definitely not intuitive (or wasn’t to me) to start with.

All I’d say is once you’ve opened up the switch or rose, stop and think about it for a bit. 

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Same as above! You'll sort it with some thinking dude (Y)

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Electrical installations are a little part of my job for many years, I hope this can help you. As my English is not that great, I'm not sure what you want exactly but I did this. There are 3 single switches, 1 per light. If you want other thing let me know and I will do another drawing

Captura.png

Edited by Guillermo M.

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19 hours ago, aener said:

 

To slightly complicate matters, I plan on having two switches for the new bulbs so they can be turned on/off at the wall or at the bed, but that's a simple addition to the circuit.

IMG-20181018-202652.png

Edited by Guillermo M.
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just to put Guillermos post into English:

Just simply tie all grounds to ground and neutrals to neutral, and switch the live with switches.

20 hours ago, aener said:

1st image for ref

Your diagram  you are switching the neutral while the device always has live. I would advise doing it the other way around.

Lets say you need to change bulbs. With your wiring it will always be live, no matter if switch is on or off. 

If you switch live to them instead of neutral , then you can switch off the power and they wont be able to shock you.

also 

1 hour ago, Guillermo M. said:

 

These are gorgeous mate, I am well impressed

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