Richie612

CrankBrothers Stamp7

20 posts in this topic

Got a bit of an issue with my CrankBros pedals. I bought them just over 6 months ago and found today that the right pedal has a wobble! 

The play is between the axle and pedal body. Initially I thought the axle might be loose so I removed the axle, gave all the parts a clean, re-greased and put back together.

Wobble is still there and I'm totally stuck on what to do next.

Does anyone have any experience with the Stamp pedals or has the same issue resolved?

Many thanks

Rich 

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11 minutes ago, monkeyseemonkeydo said:

I assume they're sealed cartridge bearings in those?

Edit: Apparently not. Replacement IGUS bearing required? https://www.dropbox.com/s/bi7mdyrcyc5a8zs/Stamp 7 %26 11 Overhaul.pdf?dl=0

Unfortunately it's not a sealed cartridge bearing, looks like a plastic bearing that comes with an overhaul kit :rolleyes:. Really disappointed a pedal of this price needs to be spent on every 6 months.

Rich 

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I don't know how good this pedals are, but CrankBros did not have a good call for MTB products.

Maybe it is better now, but some years ago, many of their products failed quickly (clipless and flat pedals, dropper post, wheels, etc.)

 

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2 hours ago, La Bourde said:

I don't know how good this pedals are, but CrankBros did not have a good call for MTB products.

Maybe it is better now, but some years ago, many of their products failed quickly (clipless and flat pedals, dropper post, wheels, etc.)

 

And now they are selling shoes too. I've been thinking of the Hope F20 pedals instead of fixing the crankbrothers ones. 

I need a wide pedal you see.

Rich 

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The Hope F20s aren't particularly big, if that's what you're looking for. I wasn't really blown away by the set I had in general - they didn't feel particularly grippy and the shape didn't really seem to work too well for me (they seem to be really flat). I believe I may have had the first gen version with the slightly different pin style, but I don't  think that was the root cause of the grip/feel issues IMO.

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6 hours ago, Mark W said:

The Hope F20s aren't particularly big, if that's what you're looking for. I wasn't really blown away by the set I had in general - they didn't feel particularly grippy and the shape didn't really seem to work too well for me (they seem to be really flat). I believe I may have had the first gen version with the slightly different pin style, but I don't  think that was the root cause of the grip/feel issues IMO.

Thanks for your personal opinion on them, much appreciated. I love the feel of the stamp 7 pedals and the grip is amazing. Just a shame they need rebuilding so often :'(.

On a plus note I contacted the shop on Ebay which I bought them from and the kind gentleman agreed to fix the issue if I sent them back to him. 

Rich 

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Second thoughts on sending the pedals off. Would a crankbrothers refresh kit remove the wobble?

Rich 

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Would expect so, have you been keeping up with the right lubrication regime?

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14 minutes ago, forteh said:

Would expect so, have you been keeping up with the right lubrication regime?

Yes indeed I have but as the pedals are only 6 months old I've only re-greased once. Only the one pedal has begun to have a wobble too which strangely is on my lazy foot side.

Rich 

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The problem with plastic bearings is that they fail very quickly if any abrasive gets in there, the grease will also act as a flush to drag out any contaminants that might have gotten in there.  We use uhmwpe (ultra high molecular weight polyethelene) bearings at work in a grit laden sewage slurry environment, they have a constant grease feed which is purely to force any grit out of the seal on the bearing; with the correct maintenance regime they will last for 15-20 years, without then you're lucky to get 3 months before the bearing has destroyed itself and taken the journal shaft with it.

Perhaps make it a monthly thing to squelch a load of grease till you get a purge of clean lubricant come out of inboard bearing?

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10 hours ago, forteh said:

The problem with plastic bearings is that they fail very quickly if any abrasive gets in there, the grease will also act as a flush to drag out any contaminants that might have gotten in there.  We use uhmwpe (ultra high molecular weight polyethelene) bearings at work in a grit laden sewage slurry environment, they have a constant grease feed which is purely to force any grit out of the seal on the bearing; with the correct maintenance regime they will last for 15-20 years, without then you're lucky to get 3 months before the bearing has destroyed itself and taken the journal shaft with it.

Perhaps make it a monthly thing to squelch a load of grease till you get a purge of clean lubricant come out of inboard bearing?

Just a shame they decided on plastic bearings, who thought that would be a good idea :S. One would have to be in the know about bearings when reading the product description to realise they were in there. 

Do you know of any other wide platforms available? Once you try wide pedals it feels very strange going back to regular size and almost uncomfortable as the weight is distributed over a smaller area on the soles.

I'll heed the advice on monthly greasing, thanks for that.

Rich 

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Is the "plastic bearing" you're talking about a bushing? If so, you won't find many/any pedals out there that have a similar platform thickness without them in there at least on either the inboard or outboard side of the pedal. The size constraints mean that a bushing is going to be a better solution than cartridge bearing. Not all are created equally though, obviously.

For larger pedals, I think the large sized Stamps are a bit of an outlier really. The DMR Vaults fall between the Stamps and the Hopes, and I think HT Components might do some slightly larger platforms but I couldn't say for sure what they are, sorry.

EDIT: Actually, the Unite Instinct pedals are 113mm x 102mm x 18mm. A few of the riders down here use them and really rate them:

 

DSC02524-2-min.jpg?fit=1920,1920&ssl=1

They use 1 x sealed bearing and 2 x IGUS bushings per side, so should hold up well. They're also fully serviceable - Unite have all the spare parts of the pedals available individually.

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Plastic bearings allow for lower body height and will take more load than an equivalent thickness needle bearing; I would guess the igus bearings are lighter and better physical packaging for a pedal than an equivalent oilite bush. Personally I would rather have slightly higher pedals and proper ball races,my easton flatboys on the intense are still going strong, 17 years old and zero maintenance :)

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Once you go to thin pedals it's pretty hard to go back! I've not really had any issues with bushings on the pedals I've had, it's typically been the bearings that have died if anything. It's a pretty good time to buy flat pedals - plenty of options to go at, and most of them are decent.

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I ride the OneUp Components Comp on one of my bike and they are my favorite pedals. No problem with them at all, not too expensive and really wide. There is an alloy version of them, but to be honest, I prefer the plastic one!

I have also some Xpedo XMX24MC, amazing light, wide, but I am not sure they will last long (thin magnesium body)

The Vault of a friend are also amazing, but the pins are so long, not sure I want to ride them on a trial bike.

 

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On 3/31/2021 at 9:20 PM, La Bourde said:

I ride the OneUp Components Comp on one of my bike and they are my favorite pedals. No problem with them at all, not too expensive and really wide. There is an alloy version of them, but to be honest, I prefer the plastic one!

I have also some Xpedo XMX24MC, amazing light, wide, but I am not sure they will last long (thin magnesium body)

The Vault of a friend are also amazing, but the pins are so long, not sure I want to ride them on a trial bike.

 

Those one up components pedals scream plastic bearings once again :rolleyes:

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But the Aluminium ones which as considerably more expensive seem to have proper bearings :D.

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23 hours ago, Richie612 said:

Those one up components pedals scream plastic bearings once again :rolleyes:

They use bushings too (albeit bronze ones, weirdly). As before, almost all thin pedals do. 

PEDAL-X-BLK.jpg?v=1596669306

The 'plastic bearings' on the Crank Brothers pedals look like a weird design, but the IGUS-style bushings in almost all other pedals are fine for that particular job.

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On 5.4.2021 at 11:59 AM, Richie612 said:

Those one up components pedals scream plastic bearings once again :rolleyes:

As Mark said, most flat pedals are using IGUS-like bushings.

I use my OneUp for almost 3 years now, I rode in really muddy or dusty conditions with. No problem at all.

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