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Rubber Queen Problem


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I got a 2nd hand RQ from a mate, it's pretty much new but I've got an odd problem. I can't get it to run true. It's bouncing up and down and sideways. I've tried the soap trick, high pressure, low pressure, bouncing, pulling/pushing the tyre into the rim and nothing seems to help. It's pretty bad, it keeps rubbing against the chainstay yoke. Any other ideas? Or is it safe to say that the German who made my tyre was drunk that day?

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The bead is actualy wider than a normal tyre bead > 26" So just need to pump the tire bit by bit a press it in, get it nice and round then pump the tyre till the wanted pressure. I think it's common for prety much every tire.

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Rubber Queen are shit! You get problems like this one, you get puncture(s) at every rides, and it doesn't fit in all frames.

The only positive thing about it is the rebound! But The Der Kaiser/Rain King rebound is much better!

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Rubber Queen are shit! You get problems like this one, you get puncture(s) at every rides, and it doesn't fit in all frames.

The only positive thing about it is the rebound! But The Der Kaiser/Rain King rebound is much better!

It should fit more frames than the Der Kaiser, seeing as the Der Kaiser's 1mm wider...

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The Rubber Queen looks like it's bigger 'cos the actual carcass appears to be bigger, although when you take into account tread heights they're simlar:

large_kaiser.jpg

large_rq24.jpg

Our heights are measured from the very tip of the tread to the rim, which is why they work out the same.

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'Crikey', a 2.4" Rubber Queen up front, Ruse? It even fits?! Would've thought any good old 2.1 or 2.2 tyre'd do, nevermind that RQ which seems more like a traditional 2.7!

General thread-jack esque question:

Since when did Continentals start becoming such a big hit on stocks? I seem to remember just back in 06/07 when I did most of my trials, it was all about Minions on the rear? At some random point during my non-trials years suddenly the German tyres blew up on the scene. I seem to recall RQs being quite a popular hit when Contis first became mega popular?

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the rain kings and de kaisers have THE grippiest compound available, plus they have the stiffest sidewalls I have ever felt which makes them the most stable tyres on off camber and points as well as being the most puncture proof. they also weigh about the same as a maxxis.

The rubber queen isn't quite as grippy as those two or maxxis, but they are the most bouncy tyres available easily adding inches to gaps and sidehops.

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do you really get that many punctures with rubberqueens? or does it mainly depend on your tire pressure and the terrain you ride? because so far I haven't had any problems with my try all sticky, but I'm thinking about getting a RQ to save some weight. I mainly ride street and use a rather high tire pressure (compared to other trials riders) I think..

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If you like the Stiky but want a lighter tyre, maybe the Stiky Lite might be worth considering?

Well I've heard the RQ has a better bounce and it's also cheaper. I guess the try all tires have a better grip but I don't ride contests or on slippery / wet terrain. so I don't care that much about grip. But I'm not a big fan of fixing punctures all the time.. so that's why I'd like to know whether the puncutres are rather caused by low tire pressure or by the RQ quality?

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Well I've heard the RQ has a better bounce and it's also cheaper. I guess the try all tires have a better grip but I don't ride contests or on slippery / wet terrain. so I don't care that much about grip. But I'm not a big fan of fixing punctures all the time.. so that's why I'd like to know whether the puncutres are rather caused by low tire pressure or by the RQ quality?

Amazing the Sticky lite has only been out about a week yet already there are experts out there giving out opinions .............for free!

My rubber queen was a bitch for snakebites, until the tube was more patch than tube :giggle:

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Well I've heard the RQ has a better bounce and it's also cheaper. I guess the try all tires have a better grip but I don't ride contests or on slippery / wet terrain. so I don't care that much about grip. But I'm not a big fan of fixing punctures all the time.. so that's why I'd like to know whether the puncutres are rather caused by low tire pressure or by the RQ quality?

If you realy want to try it. I bought one 6 month ago, ridden it twice and it been sitting in the corner ever since. I can sell it for 30 posted if you're interested.

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Amazing the Sticky lite has only been out about a week yet already there are experts out there giving out opinions .............for free!

My rubber queen was a bitch for snakebites, until the tube was more patch than tube :giggle:

I was referring to the regular sticky, not the light version.

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Well I've heard the RQ has a better bounce and it's also cheaper. I guess the try all tires have a better grip but I don't ride contests or on slippery / wet terrain. so I don't care that much about grip. But I'm not a big fan of fixing punctures all the time.. so that's why I'd like to know whether the puncutres are rather caused by low tire pressure or by the RQ quality?

The RQ gives such a good bounce because it is paper thin and has a very pliable sidewall (the carcass has a high TPI count made with fine threads and not a lot of rubber.) The downside is that it pinches easier than the heavier rear tyres available, and is less stable.

Stability and grip are just as important to me on street as on natural. It really helps with rail lines, drop gaps, bollards and anything involving a sharp or thin edge. It basically makes the bike a lot more stable and confidence inspiring when doing knarly lines. Just depends whether you want to improve your jump or your technical skills.

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The RQ gives such a good bounce because it is paper thin and has a very pliable sidewall (the carcass has a high TPI count made with fine threads and not a lot of rubber.) The downside is that it pinches easier than the heavier rear tyres available, and is less stable.

Stability and grip are just as important to me on street as on natural. It really helps with rail lines, drop gaps, bollards and anything involving a sharp or thin edge. It basically makes the bike a lot more stable and confidence inspiring when doing knarly lines. Just depends whether you want to improve your jump or your technical skills.

ok thanks for the info. I haven't thought about that yet... however I see alot of riders using RQs, so I suppose it can't be that bad!? (Giacomo Coustellier is even riding a 2.2 RQ!) well I might give it a try sooner or later or go for some other tyre. maybe the stiky lite is an option. I guess I'll have to wait for some test reports.

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A lot of people get on with it fine, it depends on your style. Its less forgiving if you make a mistake, or you are a heavy/harsh rider. Other options worth considering are the new Michelin tyre (slightly heavier than RQ,possibly better puncture protection) or the Schwalbe Big Betty. Compared to a Queen its about the same weight with excellent bounce, grip isn't quite as good, but the sidewalls are a decent thickness and they are quite hard to puncture considering the weight.

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A lot of people get on with it fine, it depends on your style. Its less forgiving if you make a mistake, or you are a heavy/harsh rider. Other options worth considering are the new Michelin tyre (slightly heavier than RQ,possibly better puncture protection) or the Schwalbe Big Betty. Compared to a Queen its about the same weight with excellent bounce, grip isn't quite as good, but the sidewalls are a decent thickness and they are quite hard to puncture considering the weight.

thanx for the tips! both tyres are worth considering.. what about front tyres? can I pick any light front tyre without worrying about punctures, since you land on the rear wheel most of the time? or will front wheel tap's cause punctures aswell?

Edited by flatpro
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